Not Sure What to Do-Please Help



  • Last year, I transferred to a new college. I had a rough time my first semester. Because of that, I didn't complete any of my courses.This semester has gone better. But, according to the school I won't be eligible for aid next fall. I'm unsure if an appeal will work or not. It sounds like I'd need sufficient documentation to even be considered. I was sick, but since doctors have been dismissive of my issues in the past, I didn't seek medical treatment. Because not completing courses has affected my GPA, it's doubtful that another school will consider me. I'm thinking the best way to resolve this would be to find a way to make up the missed courses with my own funds. But, tuition is expensive. My credit is bad, so a loan is out of the question. I guess what I really wanted to know is if there is any unexpected money coming my way. Or if the appeal will be successful. I still feel like I'm meant to keep pursuing an education, despite the obstacles.But, there have been so many roadblocks along the way.Thanks for any insight you can provide.



  • No I don't feel you have any grounds for the appeal to be successful since there is no documentation of your illness. I don't feel any money coming to you out of the blue so you may have to look at getting a job (or a second job) if you want to pay your own way through school. I feel you will only achieve your goals through hard work and determination.



  • Thanks for responding. It's good to have an answer, even if it's not what I was hoping for. It will definitely take longer if I have to pay my own way, but I think it's one of the life lessons I'm here to learn.



  • Yes I believe that too. And if that is indeed your life lesson, you will have be given the 'tools' (strength, endurance, determination etc. ) to get through it. Maybe you can think of creative ways to make money - like selling something you don't need or craftwork or taking odd jobs etc.



  • Do you see me getting a job soon? In the past, it's been a challenge to find work.



  • Also- I remembered that I did seek help for anxiety. Honestly, I think that was the main reason things did not go well. If the doctor I saw is willing to write a letter, would that change things?



  • Depends on what he puts in the letter. It would have to sound serious enough to stop you studying.



  • Well- it's difficult to talk about, but it was pretty serious. I was taking a speech class and couldn't finish it because of the anxiety. And I do feel like it was to blame for my poor test grades in some of the other classes. I also stopped attending some classes because I was just so anxious all of the time. I really was in denial about the problem being so severe. I did develop a physical illness later on, but I feel that if the anxiety hadn't caused me to miss so many classes, I would have been able to make the up the missed work. I was too embarrassed to talk to my professors about what was going on. Everyone seemed to have a different feeling about it- some profs seemed to think I was just goofing off and skipping classes, others seemed to think that I had a problem but was refusing to seek help. Had someone approached me about it, I may have sought counseling on campus. I was very unsure about it because I didn't want anyone at the school to know that I had any mental health issues.It was hard to find someone who took my insurance that I felt comfortable going to off campus. I don't like using this as an excuse, but I think I'll at least feel better admitting to someone at the school that there was a problem that I've now taken responsibility for. Also, a lot of my financial aid are loans. Either way, I have to contribute towards the costs. I don't know what this doctor would say. He has treated me in the past for similar issues, so that could be either a negative or a positive thing.



  • The problem is not so much getting back to class but whether you would not still suffer the same anxiety in the speech class if you do go back. Do you really need to do this?



  • That's a good question.Well, my options are pretty limited. I feel kind of stuck right now. I'm hoping for the best,but have to be prepared for the worst.



  • Is there something else you would wish to pursue?



  • I feel you have musical talent - have you ever pursued that sort of thing?



  • I've never tried pursuing music. I've thought about it, though. I can sing, but I just never felt like I could earn money from it.



  • I feel you have much ability and could indeed earn a decent living from it. You would need to be assessed by someone with singing or performing experience.



  • Well, I auditioned for a musical when I was a teenager, but I didn't get the part. Of course, maybe I just wasn't right for that show. I know that there are local schools that offer voice lessons, some by auditon. It's definitely something I should look into. Unfortunately, I have trouble singing in front of others now. Whenever I'm speaking or singing in front of someone, my voice sometimes chokes up. That's why I feel like I'd need voice lessons.



  • I forgot to add that usually they're not too expensive. Also, there are workshops in musical theatre that are sometimes offered. I think they're only around $200 or $300. Which is still a lot less than a college course. And if it's something I could go out and do right away, it would be worth it.



  • You are only stuck because you are not exploring all your options. No one gets anywhere without taking risks. Your ego took a blow from missing out on the musical as a teenager but that doesn't mean you will always miss out. The people who succeed in life are not those who never take a chance but those who try, get knocked back, but just keep on trying until they reach their goal. What have you got to lose by joining a choir or a musical theatre course - at least you won't be alone while performing so it can boost your confidence and you will also meet some new people.



  • Thanks! That's a really good point. It's funny because I always swore I'd never be like my parents. Both have musical talent, but felt like it was too impractical to pursue a career in music. My Dad also thought about becoming an actor. Unfortunately, the "practical" route turned out to be disastrous for them. I hadn't realized that I was on the same path until now.



  • You can be both practical AND creative. One doesn't have to cancel out the other.



  • I definitely agree. Sometimes it's easy to forget that.


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